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Robert Doyle on gambling

A few weeks back Doyle – operating, I guess, on the basis of steely Liberal principle (!) –  argued against local councils imposing extra rates on noxious gambling facilities. Councils – including Melbourne City if it increased its take from Crown – could have earned extra dollars if the proposal had gone through

In today’s Age it is claimed  that the gambling industry was a major backer of his $400,000 Melbourne City Council reelection bid.

The events going on in NSW involving State Labor leave me feeling disgusted as much as angry.  So too the obvious conflicts of interest that are pervasive through the linkages between politicians and the gambling industry in all states and involving both major political parties.

Update:  The developers also backed various members on the Melbourne City Council. In fact they backed so many that there may not be a quorum to vote on development applications.  Wouldn’t the community be devastated if the developers had wasted their hard-earned cash? (1717)

6 comments to Robert Doyle on gambling

  • conrad

    It would be good to know where the rest of their money goes — it’s no surprise that what amounted to fairly sensible pokies reforms that were well supported by the public suddenly seemed to evaporate.

  • Jim Rose

    Richard Posner pointed to a study by Barron, Staten and Wilshusen estimating that an abolition of casino gambling would reduce personal bankruptcies by 1.4 percent – and by 8 percent in counties in which or near which casinos locate.

    Singapore imposed a $100 entry fee for locals to enter the gaming floors. It has nonetheless banned up to 30,000 low income earners for gambling too much at the new casino.

  • Robert (not from UK)

    I wonder if there has been any NSW or Victorian government since at least the 1970s (of either main political party) which hasn’t just been a stooge of Big Gambling, Big Tobacco, and Big Booze.

    While I am too young to remember Joe Cahill’s Premiership (1952-59), and while the new biography of him suggests he was personally scrupulous, I do recall my parents (both now dead) telling me that in in the NSW ALP imperium of 1941-65, every lower official was for sale. Of course they were both pro-Liberal, thus they didn’t talk about Askin like that.

    Victoria held out against legal gambling long after NSW had institutionalised it, so by all accounts back in the 1950s you would have busloads of little old Victorian ladies crossing from Wodonga to Albury to get their rocks off (financially speaking) in the Albury clubs. On the other hand, in the NSW of my 1960s childhood, two-up seems to have been largely extinct. I wouldn’t mind betting there was lots more of it in Victoria until at least 1980.

  • Jim Rose

    Robert (not from UK), one reason that casino gambling was legalised was to stop corruption,

  • lurker

    A few weeks back Doyle – operating, I guess, on the basis of steely Liberal principle (!) – argued against local councils imposing extra rates on noxious gambling facilities. Councils – including Melbourne City if it increased its take from Crown – could have earned extra dollars if the proposal had gone through

    Harry,

    Are there any examples of local governments assessing special taxes in Australia in a such a blatant discriminatory way you propose? I can’t think of any. So perhaps your attempt to monster Doyle is misplaced. He was very likely to be acting on principle.

  • John Brolokes

    In good old WA we’ve allowed Crown Casino an extra gazillion pokies in return for them building a new hotel. We’ve also decided to build our new football stadium a stones throw from the casino – against the advice of a committee that spent several years assessing the merits of various proposals.

    And its not even corrupt. We’re doing Crown these favours for nothing.

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